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Alms :: Annihilation of the Self (Prairie Fire Tapes) CASSETTE

$7 CAD
Alms :: Annihilation of the Self (Prairie Fire Tapes) CASSETTE
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Alms :: Annihilation of the Self (Prairie Fire Tapes) CASSETTE

$7 CAD
From the Prairie Fire Tapes Website:

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We met up with Nathan Young (Ajilvsga, Indian Weapons, Godseye) when he was visiting Winnipeg with the Post Commodity Collective last year. Since that time, we’ve stuck up a pretty solid working relationship with him and Peyote Tapes (expect White Dog, Gomeisa, and a collab. of Nathan and Cole in the near future).

Annihilation of the Self is sourced from a radio performance Nathan did in Albuquerque earlier this year. The track was sent as a full ½ hour file that we cut promptly at the 15 minute mark to make side a and side b. The performance is primarily bowed guitar producing some captivating tones and drones that is a step away from, yet not unlike, the Harsh Meditative Trance tape released on Digitalis early on in 2011.

Pro–dubbed w/ Download code.

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Listen here:
http://prairiefiretapes.com/samples/pf031-a.mp3
http://prairiefiretapes.com/samples/pf031-b.mp3

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Foxy Digitalis:
This documents a rather minimalist guitar noise performance from Peyote Tapes’ Nathan Young that originally aired on an Albuquerque radio station earlier this year.  The thirty-minute piece (here awkwardly split in half) was played mostly using a bowed electric guitar with some metal-level distortion. Young’s playing is much more rooted in drone than doom here though, as he never coheres into a riff or a chord progression. Instead, it sounds mostly like a single sustained power chord endlessly hissing, throbbing, and subtly phase-shifting. That wouldn’t be so bad if it weren’t for one tragic thing: the piece reaches its zenith after only a few minutes, as the unadorned drone that begins the piece erupts into a brief flurry of ruined and tormented guitar moans followed by a blizzard of white noise. It’s pretty great, but Young can’t seem to figure out quite where to go from there- the last 20 minutes of the piece drag along in a morass of lo-fi amp sizzle, lazily pulsing low-end throb, and queasy feedback that fails to recapture the inspiration of the explosive opening minutes. I suppose this is still a somewhat impressive improvisatory feat given that Young largely constrains himself to a single chord, but it is an extremely limited listening experience emotionally, texturally, melodically, rhythmically, and viscerally. I suspect other abstract-minded guitarists may appreciate Young’s ingenuity under rigid self-constraint considerably more than me, but the layperson probably won’t find much to embrace here.
-Anthony D'Amico